Wroclaw
Wroclaw - Cut loose on the dancefloor, shake your thing on the bar


Short History of Wroclaw

The history of Wroclaw begins at the end of the10th century. At this time the city bears the name of Vratislavia and is limited to Ostrów Tumski (the Cathedral Island). In approximately the year 1000 King Boleslas establishes the first bishopric of Silesia. The city quickly becomes a commercial center and expands rapidly to the neighbouring Wyspa Piaskowa (Sand Island), and then to the left bank of the Odra river. In 1163 it becomes the capital of the duchy of Silesia. It is devastated by the Mongols in 1241, but then rebuilt around the Market Square (Rynek). At that time many Germans settle down in the area, and the name Breslau appears for the first time in written records. Trade is booming which results in the fact that at the end of the 13th century Wroclaw joins the Hanseatic League, a powerful association of German and North European cities. However the Polish Piast dynasty remains in control of Silesia.
The last Piast prince dies in 1335 and the duchy of Silesia is annexed to Bohemia, despite the efforts of king Casimir III of Poland. In 1526 the city is conquered by the Habsburgs, but keeps a certain level of independence. Breslau endures some very hard times during the Thirty Years War, but the treaty of Westphalia marks an economic and cultural revival. In 1741, after the assault of Frederic II, the city and most of Silesia are annexed to the kingdom of Prussia,. In 1806 the troops of Napoleon invade the city and it remains occupied by the French until 1811. Breslau thereafter stays under Prussian domination. Industrial and commercial development continues while the population of Breslau reaches 600,000 by the year 1934.
At the end of World War II, the Germans declare Wroclaw a fortress, and battle the Soviet forces for almost three months. Finally the Red Army crosses the Odra river, and on on the 7th of May 1945 - after an 82 day siege - the devastated city surrenders. The Treaty of Potsdam (1945) gives Wroclaw back to Poland.

 

Night life in Wroclaw
Poles love their nightlife and they love to boogie. Around the Boogie Hostel you'll be hard pressed to find a more jovial group of people. On any special occasion (a very subjective concept), you will have no problem finding a friendly Pole to join in the revelry. From fancy, strict-door-policy spots to laid-back beer tanks to quiet, cosy cafes... it's all here in Wroclaw!!!!.
One of the nearest pub from our hostel is Pub Felicita owned by Italians who wanted to bring a colorful slice of Italy to Wrocław. With the bright red, orange and yellow walls they've certainly created a hot environs for a party, complemented by a hot selection of disco tracks. Cut loose on the dance floor, shake your thing on the bar, or chill out with a water pipe... You'll spend many a happy hour here.

 

No Name
If it's unbridled, unadulterated fun you're after in Wroclaw then look no further than the cavernous interior of No Name. Two dancefloors ensure that punters always can find something to shake their booty to, whether they prefer latino music, chart hits, pop, r'n'b, house, or even the dreaded disco polo. During summer be sure to check out No Name's courtyard which becomes the venue of some highly entertaining beach parties, complete with drinks promos. No Name is not so much anonymous as synonymous with Wroclaw's nightlife.



Pub Felicita
One of the nearest pub from our hostel is Pub Felicita owned by Italians who wanted to bring a colourful slice of Italy to Wrocław. With the bright red, orange and yellow walls they've certainly created a hot environs for a party, complemented by a hot selection of disco tracks. Cut loose on the dancefloor, shake your thing on the bar, or chill out with a water pipe... You'll spend many a happy hour here.


Club Insomnia (Bezsennosc)
Bezsennosc is the Polish word for 'insomnia', and this proves to be an apt enough name for this classy venue: parties here go on long into the night as Wroclaw's coolest citizens huddle around tables in conversation or slip onto the small dancefloor when the eclectic mix of alternative, dance and rock moves them. Bezsennosc is also one of the best looking venues in town: its slate-grey walls are stylishly adorned by an incongruous mix of oil paintings and graffiti-style print art, whilst vast crimson drapes provide both a blood-red splash of colour and an underworld atmosphere.